Herringbone and chevron patterns are everywhere you look.  They can be found on curtains,  dishes,  clothing, lamp shades,  rugs and pillows, painted on furniture and walls, even on floors as wood or tile patterns.  As I started to see these two patterns over and over again, my analytical mind began to wonder: what exactly is the difference between these two patterns? 

Would the wood pattern on the drawer fronts of this dresser be considered a herringbone or chevron pattern?

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The wood on the drawer fronts is in a herringbone pattern.  After researching the difference between the patterns, I found that the easiest way to distinguish between them is to look at  the ends.  “Herringbone interlocks with itself while the chevron print is a perfect zigzag”, according to SN Design Studio. 

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I think Cara Highfield with Kenny & Company best described the similarity between herringbone and chevron patterns as “siblings, not twins”.  I have found that you’ll most likely find a true herringbone pattern in tile and wood applications.  I have seen chevron mostly in textiles and painted pieces.   Regardless of which sibling you find, both patterns are beautiful to see when done correctly.  Take a look:

 

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 Imagine my delight when I arrived last week at the Dell House for a Thursday work day and I saw a herringbone pattern on the fabric being used to recover the dining room chair cushions.  I literally giggled out loud.  I couldn’t have planned it any better.  Herringbone and Chevron patterns pop up all over the place.   If you’d like to see those herringbone dining room chairs in person, join us for the next installation.  Click here for more information on the volunteer opportunities for Dwell with Dignity.